Committees/Motions

Parks and Environment

Indigenous Placemaking:

 

At the last Parks and Environment committee, councillor McMahon requested that the General Manager of Parks, Forestry, and Recreation develop a framework for applying Indigenous placemaking principles to projects within the Parks, Forestry, and Recreation 10 year capital plan. They will report back to Parks and Environment with their ideas this September. You can read more about it here.


TransformTO

Our hardworking staff in the City’s Energy and Environment Division have been working diligently on the second TransformTO report.  This report highlights required measures in order to achieve the greenhouse gas reduction goal of 80% by 2050.  This report will be discussed at the next City Council meeting in July.  You can read the report here and read more on the TransformTO website.

 


Toronto and East York Community Council

Bringing Laneway Suites to the Toronto and East York District:

 

In conjunction with a groundbreaking report on laneway suites by Lanescape and Evergreen, City Councillors Ana Bailão (Ward 18, Davenport) and Mary-Margaret McMahon (Ward 32, Beaches-East York) submitted a motion to the June 13, 2017 Toronto and East York Community Council meeting to implement a laneway suites initiative in the Toronto and East York District.

The motion seeks the support of City Councillors to request Chief Planner Jennifer Keesmaat to review the Laneway Suites Report, consult with the appropriate City staff, undertake further community consultation, and report back in the first quarter of 2018 with respect to any recommended changes required to implement a laneway suites initiative in the Toronto and East York District.

The report recommends actions including the establishment of an as-of-right planning framework for laneway suites alongside a set of recommended performance standards that will provide a strong foundation for the future of laneway suites in Toronto.

The report was based on an extensive consultation process that engaged with over 3,000 Torontonians through an online survey, written feedback, and in-person consultations in Wards 18, 32 and at the Evergreen Brick Works. The laneway suites team also met with relevant City Divisions to seek feedback on addressing various technical requirements and with City Councillors in the Toronto and East York District.

The motion also requests the Chief Planner to provide an implementation strategy for laneway suites in the Toronto and East York District which may include, but is not limited to, cost, incentives, application review processes and timelines, and comparable actions from other municipalities that have implemented laneway suites.

This motion was adopted unanimously at the June 13th Toronto and East York Community Council.

The motion from Councillors Bailão and McMahon can be found here.

 


“Office of Neighbourhoods” In The City of Toronto

The City of Toronto is known as a city of neighbourhoods.  Though our population is growing, and we remain the largest city in Canada, most residents enjoy that neighbourhood feel.  As such, there are a growing number of community groups and residents associations all across Toronto.  These groups are vital to the development of grassroots initiatives for neighbourhood improvement across the city.  The City, however, does not have adequate resources to provide support for these groups.

In a similar way, businesses come together to form Business Improvement Areas to drive economic development and to provide support to one another.  The City has an established Business Improvement Area Office that currently operates out of the Department of Economic Development.

Other cities, including Ottawa, Calgary, and Portland, have all created an “Office of Neighbourhoods”.  These offices are mandated to work on issues at the neighbourhood level, to promote a culture of civic engagement and to build inclusive, safe, liveable communities.  The City of Toronto can benefit greatly from having an Office of Neighbourhoods to strengthen and support neighbourhood initiatives and residents associations.

On May 24, 2017 councillor McMahon moved a motion to establish an Office of Neighbourhoods in The City of Toronto


On-Street Permit Parking

As part of a larger initiative to implement on-street permit parking throughout all of Ward 32, permit parking will be implemented on the streets that are listed below. The Toronto and East York Community Council approved this change at its meeting on May 2, 2017.

 

The plan was brought forward by our office in response to what we perceived as an inequity in parking arrangements. Prior to this decision, 10% of the streets in Ward 32 were non-permitted and most of these streets are clustered in our two newest subdivisions: the former racetrack by Woodbine Park and Upper Beaches Estates just east of Ted Reeve Arena. To date, individuals who have parked on these streets overnight have benefited from free parking (though risking enforcement measures – i.e. ticketing) while the vast majority of Ward 32 residents have had to pay for permit parking on their respective streets. Though we are aware of the variation of on-street parking use from street to street, our office and City staff believe there is a high enough demand for overnight parking in the vicinity of these streets to warrant permit parking. In fact, some residents of these streets have called our office requesting permit parking. Implementing these changes will level the playing field for all Ward 32 residents who choose to park their vehicles on the street overnight.

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us or the Permit Parking Office.

Streets where parking permits will be implemented:

Street Name Block
Brick Court From Memory Lane to Sears Street
Northern Dancer Boulevard From Queen Street East to Lake Shore Boulevard East
Boardwalk Drive From Queen Street East to Northern Dancer Boulevard
Winners Circle From Queen Street East to Lake Shore Boulevard East
Sarah Ashbridge Avenue From Queen Street East to Lake Shore Boulevard East
Joseph Duggan Road From Queen Street East to Lake Shore Boulevard East
Coatsworth Crescent From Hanson Street to Hillingdon Avenue
Glen Ames From Lee Avenue to Southwood Drive
Long Crescent From Lee Avenue to Glen Ames
Williamson Road From Lee Avenue and Hambly Avenue
Glen Manor Road West From Williamson Road and Pine Glen
Glen Stewart Crescent From Southwood Drive to South west leg of Glen Stewart Crescent
Pine Crescent From Balsam Avenue and Glen Manor Drive
Maclean Avenue From Pine Crescent to Queen Street East
Glen Oak Drive From the West End of Glen Oak Drive to the West Leg of Glen Oak Drive
Glen Oak Drive From the West Leg of Glen Oak Drive to the East Leg of Glen Oak Drive
West Leg of Glen Oak Drive From Glen Oak Drive to the North End of Glen Oak Drive
East Leg of Glen Oak Drive From Glen Oak Drive to North End of Glen Oak Drive
Glen Oak Drive From Benlamond Drive to Benlamond Avenue
Glen Oak Drive From the East Leg of Glen Oak Drive to Benlamond Drive
Enroutes Street From Brockville Street to Dengate Road
Brockville Street From Flagman Street to Belleville Street
Belleville Street From Brockville Street to Dengate Road
Flagman Street From William Hancox Avenue to Brockville Street
Whistle Post Street From William Hancox Avenue to Ted Reeve Drive
Ted Reeve Drive From Whistle Post Street to Gerrard Street East
Crossovers Street From William Hancox Avenue to Ted Reeve Drive
Neville Park Boulevard From Queen Street East to the south end of Neville Park Boulevard
Pine Glen Road From Glen Manor Drive East to Pine Crescent
Glen Manor Drive East From Glen Manor Drive to Pine Crescent
Dundas Street East From Coxwell Avenue to Greenwood Avenue